A case study on cognitive development

May I smell them? The next food was carrots. The nurse explained to the children why carrots were good for their teeth.

A case study on cognitive development

However, even those children who are fortunate enough to have abundant available resources and who live in relative peace may not be receiving the full benefits of play.

Many of these children are being raised in an increasingly hurried and pressured style that may limit the protective benefits they would gain from child-driven play. Because every child deserves the opportunity to develop to their unique potential, child advocates must consider all factors that interfere with optimal development and press for circumstances that allow each child to fully reap the advantages associated with play.

Case Study on Piaget's Theory | caninariojana.com

Those forces that prevent children in poverty and the working class from benefiting fully from play deserve full, even urgent, attention, and will be addressed in a future document. These guidelines were written in response to the multiple forces that challenge play.

The overriding premise is that play or some available free time in the case of older children and adolescents is essential to the cognitive, physical, social, and emotional well-being of children and youth. Play is important to healthy brain development. Play allows children to create and explore a world they can master, conquering their fears while practicing adult roles, sometimes in conjunction with other children or adult caregivers.

In fact, it has been suggested that encouraging unstructured play may be an exceptional way to increase physical activity levels in children, which is one important strategy in the resolution of the obesity epidemic. The interactions that occur through play tell children that parents are fully paying attention to them and help to build enduring relationships.

Less verbal children may be able to express their views, experiences, and even frustrations through play, allowing their parents an opportunity to gain a fuller understanding of their perspective.

Quite simply, play offers parents a wonderful opportunity to engage fully with their children. Play is integral to the academic environment. It ensures that the school setting attends to the social and emotional development of children as well as their cognitive development.

Play and unscheduled time that allow for peer interactions are important components of social-emotional learning. This trend has even affected kindergarten children, who have had free play reduced in their schedules to make room for more academics. Even a formal structured physical education class may not offer the same benefit as free-play recess.

Specialized gyms and enrichment programs designed for children exist in many communities, and there is an abundance of after-school enrichment activities. These tools and programs are heavily marketed, and many parents have grown to believe that they are a requirement of good parenting and a necessity for appropriate development.

As a result, much of parent-child time is spent arranging special activities or transporting children between those activities. Free child-driven play known to benefit children is decreased, and the downtime that allows parents and children some of the most productive time for interaction is at a premium when schedules become highly packed with adult-supervised or adult-driven activities.

In addition, some worry they will not be acting as proper parents if they do not participate in this hurried lifestyle.

We can be certain that in some families, the protective influences of both play and high-quality family time are negatively affected by the current trends toward highly scheduling children.

A case study on cognitive development

As trusted child advocates, pediatric health professionals are ideally suited to help parents consider the appropriate balance between preparing for the future and living fully in the present through play, child-centered organized activities, and rich parent-child interaction.

Because there are so many forces that influence the trend toward focusing on future preparation, it is important that parents have a medical home that can reinforce the importance of some of the basic, tried-and-true aspects of child rearing.

There are more families with a single head of household or 2 working parents and fewer multigenerational households in which grandparents and extended family members can watch the children.

Therefore, fewer families have available adult supervision in the home during the workday, which makes it necessary for children to be in child care or other settings in which they can be monitored by adults throughout the day. Many parents have learned how to become increasingly efficient in balancing work and home schedules.

They wish to make the most effective use of limited time with their children and believe that facilitating their children to have every opportunity is the best use of that time. Some may use some of the standards of efficiency and productivity they have mastered at work to judge their own effectiveness as parents; this is sometimes referred to as the professionalization of parenthood.

Parents who understand that high-interaction, at-home activities eg, reading or playing with children present opportunities for highly effective parenting may feel less stress than those who feel compelled to arrange out-of-home opportunities.

Parents receive messages from a variety of sources stating that good parents actively build every skill and aptitude their child might need from the earliest ages.

They are deluged in parenting magazines and in the media with a wide range of enrichment tools and activities that tout their ability to produce super-achieving children. They read about parents who go to extreme efforts, at great personal sacrifice, to make sure their children participate in a variety of athletic and artistic opportunities.

They hear other parents in the neighborhood talk about their overburdened schedules and recognize it is the culture and even expectation of parents.

Parents receive the message that if their children are not well prepared, well balanced, and high-achieving, they will not get a desired spot in higher education.Child development Case Study.

1. Piaget stages of development: The solution uses Piaget's cognitive development theory as applied to case study. $ Add Solution to Cart Remove from Cart.

Purchase Solution. $ Add to Cart Remove from Cart. Search. Solution provided by: . 1-Swiss biologist and psychologist Jean Piaget () observed his children (and their process of making sense of the world around them) and eventually developed a four-stage model of how the mind processes new information encountered.

He posited that children progress through 4 stages and that. This case study provides support for the impact of high quality preschool learning environments on the cognitive development of economically disadvantaged children.

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Discover the world's research. 1-Swiss biologist and psychologist Jean Piaget () observed his children (and their process of making sense of the world around them) and eventually developed a four-stage model of how the mind processes new information encountered.

ass 1 case study. learning. The purpose of this report is to investigate the cognitive development of primary school children. Data of two children, aged 5 and 7 years old, was collected and analysed using a Piagetian lens in the results and analysis section of this report.

The analysis describes the. A Case Study about Child Development Lucas is almost four years old and lives with his mom and dad in a house in the country. His father is a train engineer and spends a .

Case Study on Piaget's Theory | caninariojana.com