Writing a fist fight scene

His body flops with a wet, fleshy THUD onto the ground.

Writing a fist fight scene

Writing realistic fight scenes can feel like being in one. Then again, being in a fight involves reaction, quick thinking, and intuition. A lot of times writing the scene takes the opposite: When I started writing fight scenes, I did it by feel.

writing a fist fight scene

I had an advantage: I know choreography, movement, contact, lifts, and more. I had a big disadvantage, too: I spent my time in toe shoes and tap shoes.

I did have one more advantage though: I love small textured details in books. Or taking notes on a long drive, like my character did.

So, when it came time to write a fight scene, I did what my character did. Clearly, there are caveats.

writing a fist fight scene

Hit a punching bag. When you hit like that, you get a reverberation up your arm. The beer bottle almost explodes in a blast of foam and glass shards. What if I just drop to my knees? Can I bend your finger? What if I put you in a choke hold? A leftie may have an advantage if a fighter expects a right-handed attack.

I did not know that! And how well trained is the other fighter? And if trained, in what styles? Are there objects or weapons nearby at easy reach? Who wins and what defines winning? That may be determined by your personal style as a writer.

If you describe settings lushly, you probably want to continue doing that. If your style is short and light, your fight should reflect that.

A few things are almost always important when penning a fight: Blocking Readers have to know who is where when. How did he get his elbow there? Terminology This depends on your reader. But unless you have a very specific audience, all trained in the same style, your terminology should be as general as possible.

An Axe Kick means different things in different fighting styles, so even something pretty general can get you in trouble. Fighting Style Just like dialogue should stay true to character, so should the fight.

Throw a lightning bolt?

Clarity A fight scene is one of those things that grabs a reader and drags them deeper. When anything gets confusing, the story loses them. As a writer, the last thing you want is to leave readers wondering what just happened.

Keep in mind, clarity can be different in different situations. I block out what happens, put Post-It notes all over my wall, and fill in a notebook I keep on each storyline.Here’s How To Write A Damn Good Fight Scene.

January 21, by Robert Wood 55 Comments. Image: Matthew Loffhagen. Pin. Share. The opposite of writing a fight scene, but worth the occasional consideration, I actually received some feed back from readers who felt for the characters who were more or less trapped into a fist & .

In a fight scene, you want your reader to be skimming the page, rolling with the punches, swinging with the kicks.

Fast reading pace is essential. Use only a phrase . Writing fight scenes. How much should one describe a fight scene in a screenplay? How specific should you get? What do you leave for the director/choreographer to figure out?

Writing realistic fight scenes can feel like being in one. Then again, being in a fight involves reaction, quick thinking, and intuition. A lot of times writing the scene takes the opposite: careful choreography, thinking, and re-thinking–and more. In other bars, where he was more well-known, his reputation would have already taken a beating whether he won the fight or not.

Blow-By-Blow: Writing Action and Fight Scenes -- 5 Tips | caninariojana.com

The kid went in for another shot. Tyler shoved him off. 9 Most Memorable Fight Scenes in Literature. By Joseph Brassey. It goes, roughly; "Train slow, because anger will give you speed in the fight." My first teacher drilled me with it so.

Blow-By-Blow: Writing Action and Fight Scenes -- 5 Tips | caninariojana.com